Giving Compass' Take:

• A CDC study finds that allowing low-income families enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) to buy fruits and vegetable resulted in striking health benefits for children.

• How can public and private funding help to make healthy food more accessible to kids?

• Here's an article on challenges for children in the UK to have a healthy diet. 


In 2009, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) made a major change to an aspect of federal food assistance: It began helping low-income pregnant women and women with young children afford healthier foods. Previously, families enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) had only been able to spend their benefits on a narrowly defined range of foods, including milk, infant formula, and cereal, among a few other items. The new rules greatly expanded the program’s scope, allowing users to spend WIC dollars on fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

Now, a decade later, we’re seeing an important potential consequence of this change: Children who participated in WIC are less likely to be overweight or obese.

According to a new report published in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), the rate of overweight and obese children enrolled in WIC has dropped by 3.2 percent in the years between 2010 and 2016. While that decrease may seem slight, it suggests positive, long-term consequences for the children impacted.

Read the full story on healthier foods for children by Jessica Fu at The New Food Economy.